The Humble Floorplan

April 5, 2011

Here at Cotton and Company, great effort is made to create collateral campaigns that exemplify the luxury and affluence of the communities, condominiums and resorts we promote. Every aspect of a campaign, from the promotional materials to the website, is carefully and intelligently designed to appeal to the demographic and potential homebuyers. So amongst the vivid photography, beautiful brochures, attention-grabbing ads and cutting-edge websites, it is easy to overlook one of the most important tools in real estate sales: the humble floorplan.

A floorplan looks rather simple compared to the gorgeous photography and impeccably designed collateral in our campaigns. However, the fact of the matter is that most people shop online for properties and a floorplan is one of the biggest reasons people make the jump from viewing a photo online to going to visit the property itself.One can search for properties by number of rooms, bathrooms and/or square footage. However, all these numbers can blur together and well-laid out photos communicate little to the potential buyer about where the bedrooms open up; if the kitchen has a view of the family room; whether it has adequate closet space and if the traffic and flow of the home matches the desires and needs of the potential buyer. A floor plan helps to narrow down the list of properties to visit and can even give a property that may normally be dismissed because of undesirable style and color, a second glance based upon its flow and layout.

Seasoned Real Estate Agent Frank Caputo of Sailfish Point and Sotheby’s International Realty states, “While a brochure allows a prospect to gain appreciation of the view, style of the home and surface colors, a floorplan helps them to understand the layout and flow of the living space.”

As mentioned before, every aspect of the advertising campaign is carefully designed and floorplans are no different. Compared to everything else done here at Cotton and Company, a floorplan is deceptively simple, as they are crafted to be. The raw first form of a floorplan is an architectural blueprint which contains every wall stud, electrical outlets, light fixtures and structural walls which can be terribly confusing for the client to decipher. However, at Cotton and Company, the graphic designer accepts this challenge and interprets, edits and recreates the plan into an easy-to-read and functional format. This allows the client to make important decisions concerning decorating, expansion, remodeling and any other home improvement the buyer could desire.

By offering floorplans you are also allowing the consumer to make informed and educated decisions about their future home and this can raise the consumer’s opinion of the integrity of your brand and real estate office. By knowing exactly what they are getting when they come to visit, they don’t have to be convinced of the potential of the home and can instead enjoy the experience without being given a hard sell while there. This makes the pitch, and ultimately the sale, go smoother and can make the buying experience less stressful and hopefully as exciting as buying a new home should be.